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Landscape with Aeneas at Delos
Claude
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Aeneas, prince of Troy, dressed here in an orange cloak, left his native city and arrived with his father, son, and companions on the island of Delos, home of the sun god Apollo. Anius, the King of Delos, dressed in white, gestures to an olive and palm in the centre of the painting, two trees sacred to Apollo.

The domed temple of Apollo in the background is based on the Pantheon in Rome, the city Aeneas later founds and where he settles with his family. The golden eagles on the entrance of the temple may allude to Apollo’s father, Jupiter, and the Roman Empire, which adopted the bird as its emblem. Claude combines architecture he had seen in and around Rome with imaginary forms to create an idealised scene inspired by Roman antiquity.

The subject of this painting is included in Virgil’s Aeneid and Ovid’s Metamorphoses. This episode was rarely painted during the seventeenth century, yet it is the first of six scenes from the story of Aeneas that Claude painted during the last ten years of his life.

Key facts
Artist Claude
Artist dates 1604/5? - 1682
Full title Landscape with Aeneas at Delos
Date made 1672
Medium and support Oil on canvas
Dimensions 99.6 x 134.3 cm
Inscription summary Signed; Dated and inscribed
Acquisition credit Wynn Ellis Bequest, 1876
Inventory number NG1018
Location in Gallery Not on display
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