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Booking request form

Instructions

This form has multiple steps. Content of the current step is represented in main body of the page. In order to proceed to the next step you are required to input mandatory information for the current step. At any point before you submit the form you can go back to previous step. You can jump between steps using Form navigation.

Form information is organised into 3 sections:

  • Administrative information where you need to provide information about school and key contacts for the booking. This section has four steps.
  • Group information where for each group you need to provide specifics such as preferred dates of visit, theme, student numbers. Your booking is initially for a single group, but at the end of Group information section for the current group you are asked if you would like to add more groups to your booking, which you can. Each group has 10 steps.
  • Review is the final step, where you can review all information you have inputted in the form and submit the booking request.

Form step 1 Select type of school

Form step 1 A. Please select who is making the booking

Form step 2 School details

Search and select school

This information comes from the Government's register of schools. Information in the register is provided by and can be updated by schools via their DfE Sign-in account. We refresh this information periodically, so recent changes to the register may not immediately appear on our website.

Or enter manually

Providing the URN (your school's unique identifier in the Government's register) helps us as we refer to this information when analysing our reach.

Form step 3 Your contact details

Form step 4 Finance contact details

Group X
Step 1Please select the Key Stage for Group X. Currently selected: None

Group X step 2Choose a theme for your tour to proceed to next step

Themes on offer are suited to particular age group. Please go back to step 1 of group booking and choose the key stage of the group in order to see available themes.
Students will be given an overview of their chosen period which will place it in the context of the wider history of art and help make connections across time. By looking at a small number of paintings in depth, they will explore the style, themes, materials and techniques of the time and how the art of the period fits into broader social and political developments.
Pupils will be introduced to the richness of the nation’s, and therefore their collection. They will practise their observational and visual literacy skills by focusing on three paintings from across the Gallery.
Students will be introduced to the richness of the nation’s, and therefore their collection. They will practise their observational and visual literacy skills by focusing on three paintings from across the gallery.
The National Gallery represents a slice of history (Western European History, 1250–1912), and paintings can be a good and useful record of a different time and place – such as Renaissance paintings, for example.

The materials artists had available and as a result, the way paintings look, can tell us about changing times. For example, portraits can show us how wealth, power, and status were understood and conveyed, at different times, places and political contexts; changes in fashion and etiquettes can be explored as well as the effects of significant cultural and technological changes such as the coming of the railways and photography.
Pupils will explore how a painting is made, both physically and compositionally. They will be introduced to the differing materials and processes artists have used over time. Through guided looking they will examine how artists have composed the painting, used colour, light and tone and how effects such as texture and perspective have been created.
Students spend time exploring different materials and processes that are used in the making of paintings, and their different properties. A specialist educator will investigate visually with your students how artists create, for example, perspective, pattern, colour and light.
Pupils will explore the ways in which artists have told stories in paint; how they have plotted complex narratives, created atmosphere, introduced characters and swept the viewer along in the emotion of the story, all in a single canvas. They will be encouraged to work through the story as it is portrayed in the painting, using the visual clues the artist has included, and give their own opinions and interpretation. This session is therefore suitable both as an introduction to the topic, and for those groups who already have a working knowledge of myths and legends.
Students explore a selection of myths and legends through the visual language of paintings and gain more of an understanding of the genre. Specialist educators will encourage students to express their opinions and ideas about the stories explored. These narratives never fail to engage young people. They can be a good way of encouraging looking at paintings, but specific links can also be made for students studying Homer and Virgil.
Though the religious works in the collection are essentially Christian, pupils will be encouraged to think more generally about how artists have portrayed the sacred, imagine the spaces they were commissioned for and what they meant to people at the time. Through large-scale altarpieces and smaller works for private devotion, pupils will investigate how artist have used symbols, colour, and composition to represent stories and key beliefs.
Sessions may act as a general investigation or focus on particular festivals such as Christmas or Easter.
Students will consider how religious narratives can be represented in paintings – particularly in the comparison of two treatments of the same subject (e.g. The Annunciation). Pupils will be guided in thinking about how artists represent moral ideas in Christian art – ideas of good and bad behaviour, the demands of family, sacrifice and duty. Sessions may act as a general investigation or focus on particular festivals such as Christmas or Easter.
Pupils will be given an overview of their chosen genre, looking at how it has been approached by different artists working across the periods covered by the collection. Gallery educators will guide them through the key elements of composition in either Still life, Landscape or Portraiture, encouraging comparisons of style and technique.
Students will explore chosen genre across the periods covered by the collection, looking at how it has been approached by different artists. Gallery educators will guide them through the key elements of composition in either Still life, Landscape or Portraiture, encouraging comparisons of style and technique.
See paintings come to life through storytelling and object handling on this lively trip through the Gallery, specially tailored for Early Years learners.
Available until Friday 7 October 2022. The Take One Picture focus painting in 2021/2022 is 'A Shipwreck in Stormy Seas' by Claude-Joseph Vernet. Pupils will explore the painting along with two others chosen to complement their understanding and observational skills. This session will work either as an introduction to Take One Picture or to enhance and consolidate knowledge for those who have already worked on the project.
Available from Monday 10 October 2022. The Take One Picture focus painting in 2022/2023 is 'Surprised!' by Henri Rousseau. Pupils will explore the painting along with two others chosen to complement their understanding and observational skills. This session will work either as an introduction to Take One Picture or to enhance and consolidate knowledge for those who have already worked on the project.
This session searches through the collection finding hidden symbols in paintings. Specialist educators guide pupils in looking for clues and making connections between objects in the paintings explored. Students develop their visual literacy whilst building their confidence in describing and discussing what they see.
Pupils will be introduced to the ways in which artists have represented the natural world and the built environment. During investigations in the Gallery they will discover for themselves the artistic techniques that bring the painted world alive. Sessions may focus on depictions of Water, Weather, Plants and animals, or Buildings considering how artists have represented their chosen element and created a world the viewer can inhabit.

Group X step 3Choose a topic for your theme

Some themes cover different topics. Please go back to theme selection of group booking and choose the main theme for your visit to see the available topics (if applicable for the theme selected).

Group X step 4First date preference

Group X step 5Second date preference

Group X step 6Third date preference

Group X step 7 SEND students

Do you have SEND students in your group?

Group X step 8Group size

Please enter the number of students in your group.
Total number of students

Group X step 9 Group lead contact details

Group X lead contact details

Booking form: Add another group in booking

Would you like to add another group?

Review form and submit

1. School type

1A. Who is making the booking

2. School details

3. Your contact details

4. Finance contact details

Group X details

1. Key stage

2. Theme

3. Topic (only for some themes)

4. Date preference 1

5. Date preference 2

6. Date preference 3

7. SEND students

8. Group size

9. Group lead contact details

10. Any other information


Thank you

Your unique reference number is:

Thank you for submitting a booking request for a Talking Paintings Tour at the National Gallery.

We will carefully review the details and email you within the next five working days.

If the date and time slot options you provided are available, we will book the session for you as soon as possible. Once the booking is processed, you and the group leaders will receive a confirmation email.

If none of the options are available, we will get in touch with you about finding some alternatives, so please make sure you do not book transportation until your request has been confirmed.

Should you have any questions in the meantime, please email us at schoolbookings@nationalgallery.org.uk, quoting your unique reference number.

 

Kind regards,
School Bookings Team
The National Gallery