The National Gallery 2018 autumn exhibitions

Issued June 2018

THE WOHL GALLERIES

Courtauld Impressionists: From Manet To Cézanne
17 September 2018 – 20 January 2019
Admission charge

ROOM 1

Landseer’s The Monarch Of The Glen
29 November 2018 – 3 February 2019
Admission free


COURTAULD IMPRESSIONISTS: FROM MANET TO CÉZANNE

17 September 2018 – 20 January 2019
The Wohl Galleries
Admission charge

For the first time in London since 1948 the National Gallery will display major Impressionist paintings from the Courtauld Gallery, bought in the 1920s by Samuel Courtauld, alongside works from its own collections which the businessman financed and helped acquire.

Pierre-Auguste Renoir 'La Loge (Theatre box)', 1874 © The Samuel Courtauld Trust, The Courtauld Gallery, London

This exciting exhibition – the largest number of works from Courtauld’s private collection ever seen on the walls of the National Gallery – is made possible thanks to an extensive loan of works from the Courtauld Gallery, which is closing temporarily in September 2018 as part of a major transformation project: Courtauld Connects.

Opening at the National Gallery this autumn, 'Courtauld Impressionists: From Manet to Cézanne' will trace the development of Impressionist and Post-Impressionist paintings through a selection of over forty masterpieces from Daumier to Bonnard.

As well as providing a clear introduction to the crucial developments in French painting from the 1860s to the early twentieth century, the exhibition pays tribute to Samuel Courtauld (1876–1947). It will focus on his vision, taste and motivation as he was shaping two collections: one for himself, the other for the nation, with equal tenacity and dedication.

Highlights from Courtauld’s private collection, now part of the Courtauld Gallery, will include Cézanne's 'Card Players and Man with a Pipe', Toulouse-Lautrec's 'Jane Avril in the Entrance to the Moulin Rouge', Renoir’s 'La Loge', Manet's 'A Bar at the Folies-Bergère' and Seurat's 'Young Woman Powdering Herself'.

They will hang alongside a selection of works from the Gallery’s own holdings, acquired through Courtauld’s generosity, such as Cézanne’s Self Portrait, Pissarro's Boulevard Montmartre at Night and Renoir’s At the Theatre (La Première Sortie).

This exhibition is a collaboration between the National Gallery and the Courtauld Gallery.

LANDSEER’S THE MONARCH OF THE GLEN

29 November 2018 – 3 February 2019
Room 1
Admission free

One of the world’s best known animal paintings, Edwin Landseer’s 'The Monarch of the Glen', will be displayed at the National Gallery this autumn for the first time since 1851. The large painting of a stag, which is also on show for the first time in London since 1983, has been loaned by the National Galleries of Scotland, who acquired the work in 2017 following a public fundraising appeal. The picture will be the centrepiece of an exhibition that will reveal the close connections between Landseer (1802–73) and the National Gallery.

Edwin Landseer 'The Monarch of the Glen', about 1851, Scottish National Gallery. Purchased by the National Galleries of Scotland as a part gift from Diageo Scotland Ltd, with contributions from the Heritage Lottery Fund, Dunard Fund, the Art Fund, the William Jacob Bequest, the Turtleton Trust and through public appeal 2017 (NG 2881) © National Galleries of Scotland

While 'The Monarch of the Glen' is usually associated with Scotland it is less well-known that it was originally commissioned for the Houses of Parliament in Westminster. Sir Charles Eastlake, the Gallery’s second Keeper and later first Director, was closely involved in this project. The painting was first exhibited at the Royal Academy in 1851, which was then housed in the National Gallery building. Landseer designed the lions for Nelson’s Column in Trafalgar Square and the exhibition will also include paintings and drawings connected with these famous sculptures.

As well as highlighting the artist’s close relationship to Queen Victoria, whom he tutored in etching and accompanied to the Scottish Highlands, Landseer’s 'The Monarch of the Glen' will include other paintings and drawings by Landseer of Highland scenes showing how he developed his distinctive approach to the representation of the stag as hero.

A representation of the painting made in 1966 by former National Gallery Associate Artist Sir Peter Blake will provide a living artist’s response highlighting 'The Monarch of the Glen’s' enduring appeal.

NOTES TO EDITORS

For further information, please contact the National Gallery Press Office on 020 7747 2865 or email press@ng-london.org.uk

Publicity images can be obtained from https://press.nationalgallery.org.uk/