Renaissance Late

Date and time

Friday 19 May 2017 

From 6pm

Tickets

Events are free unless otherwise stated

Enjoy a night of Renaissance-inspired music and events in celebration of The Credit Suisse Exhibition: Michelangelo & Sebastiano.

Immerse yourself in sensory explorations, take part in interactive workshops, learn new skills in artist-led sessions, and listen to live music and performances.

You can also taste delicious inspired cocktails and food, and have the chance to discover our secret bar.

Exhibition tickets can be purchased here.

More events will be announced soon.

Brush calligraphy workshop
Room 4
£10
6 –6.45pm: Book tickets
7–7.45pm: Book tickets
8 – 8.45pm: Book tickets
Try your hand at calligraphy with Quill London inspired by the beautiful letters exchanged between Michelangelo and Sebastiano.

Blank canvas
Sainsbury Wing Lecture Theatre
£12/£10 conc./£10 Members
7– 8pm: Book tickets
Look at the National Gallery’s paintings in a new way with award-winning improv comedy group.

Sugar sculpture talk
Explore the artistry of sugar with food historian Tasha Marks and discover how people of the Renaissance used desert to assert their status.

Vitruvian village
Uncover the ‘perfect’ proportions of the Renaissance. Investigate Leonardo’s anatomical formula and create a model of yourself to help populate Room 34.

Life drawing
Take part in Art Macabre’ s drawing salon inspired by Renaissance paintings in the collection.

Scandals and rivalries
Listen to gossip and tales about artists from the Renaissance period.

Renaissance selfies
Enjoy a Renaissance-inspired makeover and strike a pose with London Drawing.

Ask the experts
Discover what goes on behind the scenes at the National Gallery with short talks from our experts.

DJ Liz O’Sullivan
Treat your ears to luscious exotica and boogaloo beats.

Pop-up photo booth
Take a picture and share a memento of your night.

Secret bar
Check our Facebook page to discover our secret bar.

#NGLates

Image above: Detail from Workshop of Titian, ‘Venus and Adonis’, about 1554