MA: The Art Market and the History of Collecting

MA: The University of Buckingham and the National Gallery in association with Waddesdon Manor

The MA in The Art Market and the History of Collecting is offered by the University of Buckingham and the National Gallery in association with Waddesdon Manor (Rothschild Collections).

The programme investigates American and European art markets, and cultures of collecting from the Renaissance to the present day. A feature of the course is access to two important surviving art dealers’ archives: Agnew’s, acquired by the National Gallery in 2014, and Colnaghi’s, housed since February 2014 in the Windmill Hill Archive, Waddesdon Manor.

Aimed at art historians, would-be curators, art market professionals, collectors, and individuals with a general interest in the arts, the programme provides a pathway to a career in the art world or a step towards further postgraduate research.

Full and partial scholarships, generously funded by P. & D. Colnaghi and Co Ltd and the Tavolozza Foundation are available.

About the programme

The programme comprises two introductory weeks on principles and methodologies, followed by three four-week taught components delivered in the winter and spring terms. During the third term, and under supervision, students research a dissertation which will be submitted at the end of the December term. The course includes trips to Paris and Florence to study key European collections.

  • Part A – Private collectors and collecting
    The history of private collecting in Europe and America, with a focus on Britain, from the Renaissance onwards.
  • Part B – The art market: Dealers and auctioneers
    The European and American art markets, primarily in London, New York, and Paris, from about 1760 to the present day. The module draws upon two London-based dealer archives: the Agnew’s archive at the National Gallery and the Colnaghi archive at Windmill Hill/Waddesdon Manor.
  • Part C – Institutional collecting in the public sphere: The National Gallery and its contexts
    The origins of the National Gallery, its European counterparts (the Louvre and the influential museums in Vienna, Berlin, and Munich), and its most important British precursors (the Ashmolean, the British Museum, and the Dulwich Picture Gallery).

Further information about the MA and how to apply can be found on the University of Buckingham’s website: MA in The Art Market and the History of Collecting [External link]   

  • Research
    Find out about the latest research at the Gallery