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Focus on: Leonardo

Explore the world of Leonardo da Vinci. Watch a film about the once-in-a-lifetime exhibition 'Leonardo da Vinci: Painter at the Court of Milan' and listen to illustrated podcast clips examining his powerful art, elusive character and universal influence.

More from Focus on: Leonardo (7 videos)

  • Looking Back on Leonardo | Exhibitions | The National Gallery, London

    Experience the excitement of what was dubbed 'one of the exhibitions of the century' in this brand new retrospective of the 2011 show 'Leonardo da Vinci: Painter at the Court of Milan'. Take a look back at this unprecedented exhibition -- the first of its kind anywhere in the world -- which brought together sensational international loans never before seen in the UK. Hear exhibition curator Luke Syson reflecting on the significance of the historical show, as Larry Keith, Head of Conservation, Ashok Roy, Director of Science, and Nicholas Penny, Director of the National Gallery describe what they learnt from this once-in-a-lifetime exhibition. 'Looking Back on Leonardo' was made by Oxford Film and Television and directed by Peter Sweasey. Find out more about the exhibition 'Leonardo da Vinci: Painter at the Court of Milan' on the National Gallery website: http://www.nationalgallery.org.uk/whats-on/exhibitions/leonardo-da-vinci-painter-at-the-court-of-milan Watch this film and more on our new National Gallery Channel: http://www.nationalgallery.org.uk/channel/

    Experience the excitement of what was dubbed 'one of the exhibitions of the century' in this brand new retrospective of the 2011 show 'Leonardo da Vinci: Painter at the Court of Milan'. Take a look back at this unprecedented exhibition -- the first of its kind anywhere in the world -- which brought together sensational international loans never before seen in the UK. Hear exhibition curator Luke Syson reflecting on the significance of the historical show, as Larry Keith, Head of Conservation, Ashok Roy, Director of Science, and Nicholas Penny, Director of the National Gallery describe what they learnt from this once-in-a-lifetime exhibition. 'Looking Back on Leonardo' was made by Oxford Film and Television and directed by Peter Sweasey. Find out more about the exhibition 'Leonardo da Vinci: Painter at the Court of Milan' on the National Gallery website: http://www.nationalgallery.org.uk/whats-on/exhibitions/leonardo-da-vinci-painter-at-the-court-of-milan Watch this film and more on our new National Gallery Channel: http://www.nationalgallery.org.uk/channel/

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    Looking Back on Leonardo thumbnail07:33

    Looking Back on Leonardo | Exhibitions | The National Gallery, London

    Movie
  • Larry Keith: The picture was last restored in 1948 and 1949. And unfortunately, the varnish it had had become very foggy; not really so much yellow, but it had lost all its transparency, so it was very hard to see all the dark colours clearly, in particular. And so the decision was taken by the curator and Conservation department and was approved by the Trustees to start the restoration.

    What I’m doing now is retouching and we’re just starting this stage. So I’m just filling in the small damages and just starting to block them in a little bit. For a picture of its age, it’s really in remarkably good condition. There are some things that have to do with Leonardo’s technique that have caused some problems with drying and pigment change, but in terms of physical damage, it actually is remarkably well preserved.

    All the retouchings that we do in the Gallery are quite reversible and fully documented. You can see them quite clearly in ultraviolet light. And they’re always on top of the varnish so they’re very easily removable and the resins themselves are also quite stable and reversible, although we don’t use exactly the same pigments. Some of the pigments we use are identical – some of the earth colours – because they’re fantastically stable. But other pigments that would have been used by Leonardo and his contemporaries have changed quite a lot and if we used exactly the same material and matched it today, the retouchings would change and so the match wouldn’t hold – it wouldn’t have any longevity.

    So what we tend to do is use either the same pigments if they are stable or stable equivalents in terms of transparency and colour. One thing we are pretty careful about trying to do is replicating the layer structures that Old Master painters used because it’s often the optical relationships between underlayers and top coats that give the pictures their distinctive look. It’s not so critical with tiny damages such as the ones I’m doing now, which tend to be one layer on top of a ground and you simply match the colour. But in other areas we really try and replicate the prime and opaque undercolour, and perhaps the transparent glaze on top if that’s what the original picture has because it’s only those relationships between transparent and opaque that have to be reproduced in the retouching – even with modern equivalent materials – that make a retouching successful.

    In general, we try and make retouchings quite difficult, if not impossible, to see easily with the naked eye. Although, as I said before, with UV light and with our photographic documentation, they’re very, very easily seen. What we try and do is restore your ability to enjoy the painting, rather than bring attention to the restoration itself.

    Technical insight

    Watch Conservation's Larry Keith restoring 'The Virgin of the Rocks'

    About the video:

     

    Go behind the scenes at the National Gallery and watch the restoration of 'The Virgin of the Rocks'. Conservation's Larry Keith talks through the restoration of one of Leonardo da Vinci's most elaborate works, which underwent 18 months of specialist treatment to remove a cracked and yellowing varnish.

     

    From The National Gallery Visitor's Guide DVD

     

    Find out more about Leonardo da Vinci, The Virgin of the Rocks, about 1491/2-9 and 1506-8

     

    Read about the restoration of 'The Virgin of the Rocks'

    About the video:

     

    Go behind the scenes at the National Gallery and watch the restoration of 'The Virgin of the Rocks'. Conservation's Larry Keith talks through the restoration of one of Leonardo da Vinci's most elaborate works, which underwent 18 months of specialist treatment to remove a cracked and yellowing varnish.

     

    From The National Gallery Visitor's Guide DVD

     

    Find out more about Leonardo da Vinci, The Virgin of the Rocks, about 1491/2-9 and 1506-8

     

    Read about the restoration of 'The Virgin of the Rocks'

    Read More
     thumbnail03:41

    Technical insight

    Watch Conservation's Larry Keith restoring 'The Virgin of the Rocks'

    Movie
  • Leonardo da Vinci - The Man behind the Myth?

    The National Gallery's Luke Syson, curator of the groundbreaking 2011 exhibition 'Leonardo da Vinci: Painter at the Court of Milan', spent years preparing for the show. In this extract from the National Gallery podcast he tells Leah Kharibian whether this brought him any closer to understanding the elusive artist - who is believed to have done all he could to conceal himself from the public. To learn more about the man behind the myth, visit http://www.nationalgallery.org.uk/artists/leonardo-da-vinci

    The National Gallery's Luke Syson, curator of the groundbreaking 2011 exhibition 'Leonardo da Vinci: Painter at the Court of Milan', spent years preparing for the show. In this extract from the National Gallery podcast he tells Leah Kharibian whether this brought him any closer to understanding the elusive artist - who is believed to have done all he could to conceal himself from the public. To learn more about the man behind the myth, visit http://www.nationalgallery.org.uk/artists/leonardo-da-vinci

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     thumbnail05:15

    Leonardo da Vinci - The Man behind the Myth?

    Movie
  • Miranda Hinkley (in the studio): Leonardo da Vinci’s work has influenced many artists down the centuries.... among them contemporary British painter, Jenny Saville. Fascinated by the body and the flesh, Saville is best-known for her outsized paintings of female nudes... and last year, exhibited a series of three drawings – collectively entitled 'Reproduction' – depicting multiple impressions of mother and child. The works were directly inspired by Renaissance nativity scenes, and in particular, a highlight of the current exhibition. Leonardo’s 'The Virgin and Child with St Anne and John the Baptist' – also known as 'The Burlington House Cartoon' – depicts the Virgin contending with a lively Christ-child. Colin Wiggins caught up with Jenny after her visit to the show, and began by asking how long Leonardo’s 'Cartoon' had been important to her.

    Jenny Saville: Since I can’t remember, actually. It was in my parent’s house – a reproduction of it – and I moved house quite a lot in my childhood and that drawing... for some reason my parents used to the paintings up, or the reproductions of paintings up, first, wherever we moved to and so this drawing would reappear somewhere, and I literally used to go and visit the drawing on my way to school so it was the last thing I saw before I left the house. And eventually it became such a thing that my parents actually used to hang it in the lobby on the door on the way out because they knew how much I liked to look at it. And I didn’t really acknowledge the subject matter that much... what it was, it was the revolving forms. I couldn’t work out which leg belonged to who...and this sort of endless movement, which seemed to have an internal structure that I didn’t understand – and the poetry of it...

    Colin Wiggins: So you’re a child and it has a kind of talismanic importance to you?

    Jenny Saville: Yeah, and when I was learning to drawn... I mean his anatomical studies, I used to copy those a lot... I’ve done endless copies of his hands... I mean when you’re interested in drawing the figure, there’s no one better to go and have a look at.

    The hand works because the flesh sits on a structure and most artists don’t understand that structure. And it’s the combination of that scientific view, mixed with a very poetic view that makes him quite astounding. And I don’t think anybody in art history, probably, has studied to that kind of level really. But these interlocking legs – you see this in Michelangelo... I mean this dictates the next sort of 20 or 30 years of art. Even the climbing forms of Michelangelo come out of this sort of drawing. Because I noticed when you do multiple forms one on top of one another, new forms emerge, just by themselves – and that’s when it gets interesting... how come this form? How come that form? And then you’re on a ride that’s internal to the drawing. That’s what makes it so fascinating because it’s not about the external world, it’s about the internal world of the drawing itself, so it’s to do with the making and that’s what I think he was tapping into at that time.

    Colin Wiggins: And the whole show – what was your reaction when we first dropped you in this amazing exhibition with hardly anybody in there, before it’s open to the public?

    Jenny Saville: I think what I got off it that I didn’t expect was the level of exquisiteness – it’s unbelievably exquisite – and I think it’s so profoundly poetic and the drawings, I think are... I find the drawings more forgiving because I can work out what’s going on. And I think it’s a treat to see 'The Virgin of the Rocks', both versions of that – you’re never going to see that again – even Leonardo didn’t see that so it’s an unbelievable treat. And to see the 'Cartoon' at a better height for my viewing is really brilliant. But I love his curiosity – I mean he lives an artist’s life, like a real artist’s life, in terms of this endless child-like, not child-ish, but child-like curiosity and that desire to see – and the only way to understand is through seeing and the importance of sight – is just always with me.

    Someone told me at art school, if you’re going to have heroes, make sure they’re very good. So I’ve always lived with that. I always like artists that are the really great ones (laugh).

    Miranda Hinkley (in the studio): You've been listening to an extract from the National Gallery Podcast. You can subscribe to the monthly show by visiting www.nationalgallery.org.uk/podcasts

    Artist's insight

    Painter Jenny Saville on the influence of Leonardo on her own work

    About the podcast clip:

     

    Contemporary British artist Jenny Saville, famous for her large-scale paintings of female nudes, tells Colin Wiggins how she takes inspiration from Renaissance nativity scenes and The Burlington House Cartoon by Leonardo da Vinci.

     

    From the National Gallery Podcast: Episode Sixty Two (December 2011)

     

    Find out more about the 2011 exhibition, Leonardo da Vinci: Painter at the Court of Milan

     

    More about Leonardo da Vinci, 1452-1519 

    About the podcast clip:

     

    Contemporary British artist Jenny Saville, famous for her large-scale paintings of female nudes, tells Colin Wiggins how she takes inspiration from Renaissance nativity scenes and The Burlington House Cartoon by Leonardo da Vinci.

     

    From the National Gallery Podcast: Episode Sixty Two (December 2011)

     

    Find out more about the 2011 exhibition, Leonardo da Vinci: Painter at the Court of Milan

     

    More about Leonardo da Vinci, 1452-1519 

    Read More
     thumbnail04:51

    Artist's insight

    Painter Jenny Saville on the influence of Leonardo on her own work

    Movie
  • Miranda Hinkley (in the studio): Right now, exhibition curator, Luke Syson, is probably the busiest man in the Gallery... but we caught up with him... briefly... to hear about one of the highlights of the show.

    The exhibition will bring together two pictures that bookend Leonardo’s 18-year stay in the city of Milan. These are the artist’s two versions of his great altarpiece 'The Virgin of the Rocks' – one of which is among the National Gallery’s most treasured pictures, the other, an extraordinary loan from the Louvre.

    With just a week to go before we can see these works together for ourselves, Leah Kharibian asked Luke how significant it will be to have them both in the gallery.

    Luke Syson: More than historic, it feels almost miraculous. The Louvre’s extraordinary generosity in lending their version of 'The Virgin of the Rocks' means that we can see these two pictures, theirs and ours at the National Gallery, together for the very first time and this may be something that even Leonardo never saw.

    Leah Kharibian: You don’t think he may have had them in the studio at the same time?

    Luke Syson: It seems a bit unlikely. Obviously we can’t tell precisely, but certainly in modern times nobody’s ever seen these two pictures together in the same room. And I think what’s exciting about it is that although I already have my ideas about what the differences between the two pictures mean, this is really a moment for everybody to look at the two of them and to make up their minds about the relationship between the two pictures.

    Leah Kharibian: Now the Louvre version of 'The Virgin of the Rocks' is the earlier of the two pictures, and it’s also – am I right? – the first picture that Leonardo paints after coming to Milan in about 1482 and I was wondering if you could describe it and what you feel it actually tells us about Leonardo’s ideas and ambitions for art at this date.

    Luke Syson: You’re seeing Leonardo here still very much a Florentine painter and he’s done certain things which mark him out in that way. It’s a picture that shows the four different characters, the Virgin, an angel and then the two babies, to the left, St John the Baptist, and then in the middle, the sweetly charming Christ Child blessing his cousin on the other side of the picture. And they’re all set in a very careful stage in a way... this is a rocky grotto, but it’s also a space that’s really quite clearly defined.

    And what you see here is really Leonardo, the ultimate naturalistic painter. You’re seeing flowers, for example, in the foreground, irises, which are exquisitely observed... or lilies... ivy growing up the rocks in the background. And all of these show Leonardo at a moment when he’s been studying the world around him with a concentration that perhaps nobody... that was perhaps unprecedented.

    Leah Kharibian: So coming to the second version of the picture, can you tell us what you think might have changed?

    Luke Syson: Well, there are certain quite formal things which have changed, so whereas in the first, the angel looks out at us and points at the Baptist, he’s really there as a kind of guide to the painting. But in the National Gallery painting, that pointing hand has been eliminated and the angel’s gaze is now looking inwards... it’s averted from the viewer and if it’s as if the whole of the rest of the scene becomes dream-like; it’s as if it’s occurring in the head of that angel.

    The figures have become more monumental; the draperies in particular are much less complicated and busy and perhaps most importantly the sense of relief and colour has changed very profoundly. So where the red robe for example worn by the angel in the Louvre picture has become a kind of muted dusty version of the Virgin’s blue robe... and whereas, as I say, the Louvre picture is carefully set on a defined stage, the National Gallery painting is much more complicated in terms of the space that’s being described.

    Leah Kharibian: And what about Leonardo’s personal circumstances? What had changed between the two pictures?

    Luke Syson: Leonardo arrived in Milan as a painter of extraordinary talent but no substantial record and without any real guarantee that he was going to make a success of it in this new city. What he was aiming to do was to catch the eye of Lodivico Il Moro the ruler of Milan, although as regent rather than the Duke at that particular point, and I think over the course of the next few years, that’s exactly what he did. He persuaded the Duke that what he needed was a court artist of his calibre... somebody who could do much more than glamorous, interior decoration, and who could stand for his own talent. And this was a mutual benefit society if you like because at the same time Lodivico could demonstrate his own particular ability by the recognition of great talent.

    And in a way that’s what Leonardo’s stylistic decisions very subtly mirror and echo. Leonardo’s view of a perfect world was one that could express Ludivoco’s. So whereas he begins by thinking that painting should be the mirror of nature; that it should accurately reflect everything that you could see around you, by the time he’s painting this picture he’s settled at court; he’s got a salary, and the time and space to think more about what a painting can be... what a painting can do. And I think now he’s thinking about the painter’s ability really to see more than nature; to arrive at an ideal which is perhaps closer to the perfect idea of everything that it was believed God held in his head, that we’re seeing here painted, for our delight, God’s perfect plan for the universe.

    Miranda Hinkley (in the studio): You've been listening to an extract from the National Gallery Podcast. You can subscribe to the monthly show by visiting www.nationalgallery.org.uk/podcasts

    Curator's insight

    Luke Syson on the two versions of 'The Virgin of the Rocks'

    About the podcast clip:

     

    Discover the historical and 'almost miraculous' significance of displaying both versions of Leonardo da Vinci's The Virgin of the Rocks in the 2011 exhibition Leonardo da Vinci: Painter at the Court of Milan. With curator Luke Syson and Leah Kharibian.

    From the National Gallery Podcast: Episode Sixty One (November 2011)

     

    More about Leonardo da Vinci, 1452-1519

    About the podcast clip:

     

    Discover the historical and 'almost miraculous' significance of displaying both versions of Leonardo da Vinci's The Virgin of the Rocks in the 2011 exhibition Leonardo da Vinci: Painter at the Court of Milan. With curator Luke Syson and Leah Kharibian.

    From the National Gallery Podcast: Episode Sixty One (November 2011)

     

    More about Leonardo da Vinci, 1452-1519

    Read More
     thumbnail06:24

    Curator's insight

    Luke Syson on the two versions of 'The Virgin of the Rocks'

    Movie
  • Leah Kharibian: Luke, we’re here in your office, surrounded by books and paperwork and there’s six months left to go – what’s still left for you to do?

    Luke Syson: Sometimes it feels like practically everything. On other, saner days, I realise that we’ve already got quite far. So lots of decisions really about where things go, how they’re labelled, how they’re explained. Then I suppose some very keen loans just to pin down at this last stage – discussions that have been going on for quite a long time... people don’t lend pictures by Leonardo lightly – I mean there are so few of them and they’re so important for each institution as an emblem of the particular galleries that contain them as much as anything else. So yeah... discussions that have been going on literally for years in some cases.

    Leah Kharibian: And is there anything in particular that’s keeping you awake at night?

    Luke Syson: Funnily enough it’s probably the cumulative stuff as much as anything else. Little things and big things and little things that can become magnified into big things in the middle of the night especially. I suppose the thing that’s keeping me awake most at night is the idea that we have, I think, pulled off a show that will be amazing and I need to finish a catalogue which is up to par, which is as good as it should be, and Leonardo is a very, very difficult artist. This is a real challenge – it would be a challenge for anybody, I think, but what we’re trying to do is explain an artist who wasn’t just a painter, he was a painter-philosopher, and therefore I’ve had to get my head around an extraordinary range of things that Leonardo was interested in, and you know it’s like being a tiny little person trying to understand a giant, and that’s part of the thing that’s making me... giving me the heebie-jeebies now and then.

    Leah Kharibian: I’m not surprised... I’m not surprised at all. Now, the show I know has got some absolutely amazing loans, and once you’ve got this exhibition list together how do you go about deciding what’s going to be hung where?

    Luke Syson: Well, I think it’s probably easiest to explain that in front of the 3D model that we use and some layouts and I’ll take you to where we keep that now. ... So here we are with the cardboard model of the temporary exhibition galleries of the Sainsbury Wing and what I’m provided with by our design department is tiny, tiny little postage stamp reproductions of each of the pictures and drawings that are going in the show, or that we hope will... so sometimes it’s a bit speculative this. But on the whole what we’re doing with this is using the shapes of the rooms to work out where absolutely everything will go. If we fail to achieve a loan, then it comes off the wall and the little bit of blue tack is stuck somewhere else. So that’s what we’ve got there.

    And what I’m thinking about is the logical order in terms of the story we want to tell, but also the visual impact and how those two things relate to each other. So for example, we’ve got our own ‘Virgin of the Rocks’ on the vista in the big room, but equally we want to take people through the sequence of rooms at the beginning and those climax with the St Jerome coming from the Vatican. And of course the other thing we’re doing here is thinking well these spaces are going to be crowded and so do we have to tell a story in a completely linear way or can it be one where the story builds up even if you see things in a slightly different order.

    Leah Kharibian: Now there are six months to go but can you actually at the moment picture yourself at the opening, you know, proud curator at the opening, or is a case that there’s just still too much to worry about?

    Luke Syson: I think it would be fair to describe my state of mind at the moment as a bit of a roller coaster in that at my most optimistic I think this is going to be the most extraordinary assemblage of works by Leonardo that has ever been seen in one place and then the enormity of the task of pulling that off suddenly will make me sit up in bed at 3.30 in the morning.

    And so I’m just really waiting to see those last loans fall into place and then at the same time I’m finishing off the catalogue and I need that to be worthy of a really great show.

    Leah Kharibian: I’m sure it will be – thank you so much Luke.

    Luke Syson: Pleasure.

    Miranda Hinkley (in the studio): You've been listening to an extract from the National Gallery Podcast. You can subscribe to the monthly show by visiting www.nationalgallery.org.uk/podcasts

    Curator's insight

    Luke Syson on setting up an historic exhibition

    About the podcast clip:

     

    Countdown to Leonardo: Luke Syson, curator of the 2011 exhibition Leonardo da Vinci: Painter at the Court of Milan, tells Leah Kharibian what exactly went through his mind in the run-up to the big show.

     

    From the National Gallery Podcast: Episode Fifty Five (May 2011)

     

    More about Leonardo da Vinci, 1452-1519

    About the podcast clip:

     

    Countdown to Leonardo: Luke Syson, curator of the 2011 exhibition Leonardo da Vinci: Painter at the Court of Milan, tells Leah Kharibian what exactly went through his mind in the run-up to the big show.

     

    From the National Gallery Podcast: Episode Fifty Five (May 2011)

     

    More about Leonardo da Vinci, 1452-1519

    Read More
     thumbnail05:01

    Curator's insight

    Luke Syson on setting up an historic exhibition

    Movie
  • Miranda Hinkley (in the studio): It was during his 18-year-stay in Milan that Leonardo da Vinci embarked on his studies of human anatomy. The results are documented in the exhibition in a wonderful collection of drawings, which see the artist explore every corner of the body, from the wiring of the nervous system to the functions of the brain itself.

    Martin Kemp, the world renowned expert on Leonardo, has made a particular study of Leonardo as scientist – and chose two drawings from the exhibition to tell us more about this aspect of the artist’s work. The first shows the exterior of a human skull, the second what Leonardo thought was going on inside.

    Martin Kemp: Leonardo, we know, is interested in art and a range of sciences, particularly anatomy, and the anatomy, clearly it comes partly out of his work as an artist, you know how does the body function? This skull drawing, dated 1489, so it’s a key moment for us in his anatomical work and it’s really the start of his serious anatomical investigations about the age of 37 or so. And here he’s looking at the outside of the skull with incredible precision... and tracking some of blood vessels. The skull is probably rather a battered skull... it’s not one from a fresh cadaver, as it were; it’s probably one that’s come up from a graveyard and it’s missing some teeth and so on.

    Getting hold of anatomical material was difficult – but Leonardo, when he had the opportunity, did. But we look at this and think, oh yes, this will do the art very well, but in fact what’s he really interested in 1489 is what’s going on inside the skull... he’s interested in the eye, the brain, the mental processes. At the beginning of the exhibition, we’ve got this extraordinary drawing of the sectioning of the human head to show what’s going on in the brain – this in a way opens the exhibition, and it’s a very good one, because Leonardo is so interested in sight, in thought, in imagination – all these things. So behind all the paintings here, there is all this brain work going on.

    The drawing of the inside of the skull, compared with the outside, looks very schematic. This is a vertical section and a horizontal section, and he thought – which is traditional – that the mental processes went on in the ventricles.... that’s these round vessels inside the brain. It’s not a daft idea, because unless you’ve got a microscope and staining, the grey matter looks like jelly... you know, it doesn’t look as if it does anything, so it was logical to think that mental processes happened in these interior spaces and he’s got three of them here. The first one is receptor of impressions, where things are gathered together. The second one is the big deal – that has got intellect, imagination, voluntary motion – all the mental processes and what he calls the 'sensus communis' – Latin – common sense, which is where all the senses gather together in a single point.

    At the end of the system, he’s got 'memoria' ... he’s got memory, so it’s a kind of processing plant for all the sensory impressions, and the essential one, intellect, thinks about them... 'fantasia', imagination, as we would call it, invents new things... so that central one, right at the centre of the skull, this is the crucible for all the mental processes. These studies of the brain are done in Milan.

    Now Milan was a major medical centre – it was a major centre with surgeons and people who Leonardo knew. Florence was obviously a great intellectual power house as well, but I think Milan, with its slightly more practical learning, suited him rather well. The other virtue of being a court artist – 'stipendiat', as it’s called, which means he’s got a stipend, a regular income – is it saves him from the job of making a living selling paintings. We know that he didn’t finish many paintings, so being a jack-of-all-trades at the court, doing festivals, doing weaponry, doing architecture, doing consultancy – as we’d now call it – suited him rather well. So being in the Milanese court was a very good environment for Leonardo.

    Miranda Hinkley (in the studio): You've been listening to an extract from the National Gallery Podcast. You can subscribe to the monthly show by visiting www.nationalgallery.org.uk/podcasts

    Personal response

    Historian Martin Kemp explores Leonardo's drawings

    About the podcast clip:

     

    World-renowned Leonardo expert Martin Kemp looks at two of the artist’s anatomical drawings showing the human head.

     

    From the National Gallery Podcast: Episode Sixty Two (December 2011).

     

    Find out more about the 2011 exhibition Leonardo da Vinci: Painter at the Court of Milan

     

    More about Leonardo da Vinci, 1452-1519

    About the podcast clip:

     

    World-renowned Leonardo expert Martin Kemp looks at two of the artist’s anatomical drawings showing the human head.

     

    From the National Gallery Podcast: Episode Sixty Two (December 2011).

     

    Find out more about the 2011 exhibition Leonardo da Vinci: Painter at the Court of Milan

     

    More about Leonardo da Vinci, 1452-1519

    Read More
     thumbnail05:03

    Personal response

    Historian Martin Kemp explores Leonardo's drawings

    Movie
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