The Language of Quiet

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The Language of Quiet

Date and time

Saturday 31 August, 11am–5pm

Sainsbury Wing Conference Room 2

Esther Morgan and Gill Hart

Tickets

£50/£40 concessions (ticket includes entry to the exhibition 'Vermeer and Music: The Art of Love and Leisure')

Places are limited to 15

Fully booked

Domestic in scale and content, paintings such as Young Woman seated at a Virginal will provide a focal point for this day long writing course.

Thinking about moments of stillness in our day to day lives with award winning poet Esther Morgan, you will spend time with the paintings, and then create your own written responses. The day will include the opportunity to work in smaller groups with the course leaders.

This course is run in partnership with The Poetry Society [External link].

Esther Morgan

Esther Morgan first started writing poetry while working as a volunteer at the Wordsworth Trust in Grasmere, Cumbria. After completing an MA in Creative Writing at the University of East Anglia in 1997, she taught on UEA's undergraduate creative writing course and for the Department of Continuing Education.

She was awarded an Eric Gregory Award in 1998 and her first collection, 'Beyond Calling Distance', was published by Bloodaxe in 2001. It won the Aldeburgh First Collection Prize and was shortlisted for the John Llewellyn Rhys Prize. Her second collection, 'The Silence Living in Houses' (Bloodaxe Books, 2005), was largely inspired by her time caretaking a run-down Edwardian house in Goring-on-Thames, Oxfordshire. In 2010 she won the Bridport Poetry Prize for her poem 'This Morning', included in her third collection 'Grace' (Bloodaxe Books, 2011), a Poetry Book Society Recommendation, which was also shortlisted for the T. S. Eliot Prize.

She has run Arvon courses, worked as an editor for the Poetry Archive [External link], the world's largest online collection of poets reading their own work and most recently, guest edited the spring 2013 edition of 'Poetry Review' alongside Moniza Alvi.

Image above: Detail from Johannes Vermeer, A Young Woman seated at a Virginal, about 1670-2

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