History Group Papers: 2003

Read an outline of the talks and papers from the National Gallery History Group in 2003:

Meeting Thirteen: 11 March 2003

The Notional Gallery: Competitions, Controversy and Carbuncles. Imagining a Gallery “Worthy of the Nation”, 1753-1866 – Jonathan Conlin, Sidney Sussex College, Cambridge
The National Gallery Archive does not hold a copy of these papers.

A discussion about the National Gallery that never was. During the 19th century different locations and types of building were proposed as possible homes for the nation's pictures. Debates surrounding these designs invite comparison with contemporary public building projects, such as London's royal palaces and the Houses of Parliament.

The Development of the Sainsbury Wing – Barbara Pezzini, National Gallery
The National Gallery Archive does not hold a copy of this paper.

The Sainsbury Wing was received with harsh criticism and moderated praise. This paper summarised the history of the development of the Hampton site from 1958 to 1991, focusing on the different architectural styles of never-realised projects for the new wing. It re-examined the polemics following the unveiling of the winning design and analysed the architectural vocabulary of the building.

Meeting Fourteen: 13 May 2003

Sir Philip Hendy (1900-1980) was Director of the National Gallery from 1946 to 1967. He has largely been overshadowed as Director by his predecessor, Kenneth Clark. However, Hendy led the Gallery through a period of post-war reconstruction, modernised its administration and ensured an impressive acquisition record, while continuing to pursue scholarly research.

This meeting focused attention on Hendy’s work both as scholar and director, in an attempt to cast light on a period that has, as yet, been little researched.

Sir Philip Hendy’s Scholarship – Jennifer Fletcher, formerly Courtauld Institute
The National Gallery Archive does not hold a copy of this paper.

This paper examined Hendy’s reaction to Lorenzo Lotto, based on Jennifer Fletcher’s research on his annotated copy of the catalogue for the 1953 exhibition in Venice, and considered his connections with art historians and painters in the Italian city.

Philip Hendy and the Leonardo Appeal of 1962 – Barbara Pezzini, National Gallery
The National Gallery Archive does not hold a copy of this paper.

This paper looked at the colourful history of the acquisition of Leonardo’s ‘The Virgin and St. Anne’, which saw Hendy orchestrate the Gallery’s first public appeal within the wider framework of acquisition policy during Hendy’s time and the impact the acquisition has made on Leonardo studies.

Philip Hendy’s Papers in the National Gallery Archive – Isobel Siddons, National Gallery
The National Gallery Archive does not hold a copy of this paper.

Hendy’s private papers in the National Gallery Archive illustrate his early career and work at the National Gallery, his contact with the international museum community and friendship with contemporary artists.

Meeting Fifteen: 14 October 2003

The Layard Bequest to the National Gallery 1894 – Mariachiara Bianchi, University of Parma
A paper or related publication is available for consultation in the National Gallery Archive.

However well known Henry Layard might have been, little attention has been paid to the extensive documents he left about himself. The history of his paintings collection has often been traced in dry terms, without any investigation into the causes which led to their purchase.

The aim of this paper was to show that Layard was a man whose love for art was deeply felt and constantly developing. His eventful life put him in contact with different sources of inspiration and helped give shape to his own peculiar taste. Taken together, his published material and his more private writings provide a glimpse at his true attitude towards artistic matters.

Collecting Modern Foreign Art at the Tate and National Galleries 1913-1945  Madeleine Korn
A paper or related publication is available for consultation in the National Gallery Archive.

This paper examined the claim that the National Gallery and the Tate Gallery failed to form collections of modern foreign art well into the 20th century. It showed that, by 1945, both galleries had acquired a number of important paintings by modern foreign artists.

This art was not only by the ImpressionistsDegas, Monet, Morisot, Pissarro, Sisley and Renoir – and the Post-Impressionists Cézanne, Gauguin, Seurat and Van Gogh – but also by contemporary foreign artists such as Braque, Matisse and Picasso.

Read further papers from the National Gallery History Group

 
  • Share