Sir Philip Hendy: director and scholar in Leeds and London, 1934-1967

'Sir Philip Hendy (1900-1980) director and scholar in Leeds and London 1934-1967: the acquisition and display of art and curatorial practices in ages of austerity'

The National Gallery is delighted to announce a new fully-funded PhD studentship in partnership with the University of Leeds.

Collaborative Doctoral Partnership

Starting in October 2013 as part of the AHRC’s new Collaborative Doctoral Partnership Scheme, the award provides an opportunity to undertake high quality historic research combined with an exceptional opportunity to gain practical work experience within one of the world’s foremost art galleries - leading to a PhD with one of the UK’s leading universities.

Outcomes of the studentship

‘Sir Philip Hendy (1900-1980) director and scholar in Leeds and London 1934-1967: the acquisition and display of art and curatorial practices in ages of austerity’ will research the curatorial practices of Sir Philip Hendy, Director of the National Gallery between 1946 and 1967 and Director of Leeds Museums and Galleries between 1934 and 1946. An investigation of Hendy as museum director is an opportunity for an enhanced understanding of the history of two key institutions and their role in the public display and interpretation of artworks, as well as an assessment of the changing relationships between regional and national art museums.

The focus on Hendy will provide an important case study for the history of curatorship and its political, social and cultural contexts; further illuminating the significance of the changing methods and practices of museum curatorship in times of economic, political and social crisis.

About the Collaborative Doctoral Partnerships

The National Gallery offers a small number of Collaborative Doctoral Partnerships, funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) and run in partnership with higher education institutions. These studentships focus on specific themes relevant to the Gallery's collection and wider research themes.

Applications

Applications for this post are now closed.

Image above: Detail from Sir Philip Hendy rehanging paintings, A Whittington, John Bull, 1956

 
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