Study Day: Barber Institute of Fine Arts

Collecting, exhibitions, building developments and new ways of disseminating information on the web were the topics of this study day. It was held at the Barber Institute of Fine Arts in the University of Birmingham on 7 July 2011.

This study day, organised as part of the Subject Specialist Network, drew a wide range of delegates. As well as attending the talks, they were taken on a tour of the Barber Institute of Fine Arts and its current exhibition, ‘Court on Canvas: Tennis in Art’.

Programme: Morning

The Barber Institute under Sir Ellis Waterhouse (1952–70)
Robert Wenley, Head of Collections and Learning, the Barber Institute of Fine Arts, Birmingham

The eminent art historian, Ellis Waterhouse, was the second director of the Barber Institute of Fine Arts. Robert Wenley explained how Waterhouse used his expertise to purchase an important range of paintings, including the altarpiece ‘The Adoration of the Child Jesus’ by Cosimo Rosselli, the first work of its kind in the collection, and some significant Baroque paintings.

Find out more about the Barber Institute of Fine Arts [External link]

The Baron de Ferrieres Collection and Future Redevelopment Plans for the Museum
Helen Brown, Collection Manager, Cheltenham Art Gallery and Museum

Helen Brown outlined how the Baron de Ferrieres Collection, comprising 17th- and 19th-century Dutch paintings, was created and left to the Cheltenham Art Gallery and Museum. She showed some of its highlights, such as two works by Jan Steen, ‘The Fat Kitchen’ and ‘The Lean Kitchen’. She explained the building redevelopment at the Cheltenham Art Gallery and Museum, which will contain new facilities, such as a temporary exhibition space and a new art gallery in which to redisplay these Dutch paintings.

Visit the Cheltenham Art Gallery and Museum website [External link]

The Exhibition ‘Jan Gossaert’s Renaissance’ at the National Gallery
Susan Foister, Deputy Director, National Gallery, London

‘Jan Gossaert’s Renaissance’ was shown at the National Gallery, London (23 February – 30 May 2011) and the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York (6 October 2010 – 17 January 2011), and it was co-organised by both galleries.

Susan Foister explained that the National Gallery has one of the great collections of Jan Gossaert’s work, including the major painting, ‘Adoration of the Kings’. Although not a household name, Gossaert is an artist of very high quality; the Gallery therefore felt that it was important to stage this exhibition, the first major monographic show of Gossaert’s work since 1962. Foister outlined how she developed the exhibition themes for the London show.

Find out more about ‘Jan Gossaert’s Renaissance’ at the National Gallery

Next: Programme: Afternoon

 
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